Walking On Sunshine*

Header Image: Swamp Sunflowers, Marl Bed Flats, Lake Jessup, Florida, USA

(We interrupt our irregularly scheduled attempts at blogging to bring you a public service announcement. There is joy in the world. Seek it.)

Or, as our favorite group of all time used to say: “And now for something completely different.”**

*(“Walking On Sunshine” by Katrina and the Waves. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPUmE-tne5U

Yes, you may sing along.)

The Narrowleaf or Swamp Sunflower (Helianthus angustifolius) is quite common throughout much of the eastern United States. It likes to keep its feet wet. Growing in sometimes dense patches, the plant normally grows to four or five feet tall and can reach over seven feet. A single plant can produce dozens of bright yellow flowers. Blooming season is from September to November.

Yesterday, October 12, we visited Marl Bed Flats on the shore of Lake Jessup in Seminole County Florida. A short hike through a wonderful oak hammock opened onto the vista of thousands of blooming sunflowers.

We hope your day will be as brightened by the views as was ours.

Many thanks to Ed at https://edrosack.com/2021/10/03/sunflower-status-oct-2-2021/ for turning us on to this spectacular venue! (Be sure to check out Ed’s superb Flickr images.)

**Monty Python’s Flying Circus.

Enjoy your search for a natural place and come back for a visit.

18 Comments on “Walking On Sunshine*

  1. That’s one of my favorite songs, and a great video. Those sunflowers are pretty darned nice, too. As it happens, I found narrowleaf sunflowers at Attwater last Sunday. There weren’t nearly as many as in your photos, but they were showing off their height, and I managed a few photos. There weren’t any prairie palm trees, though! My favorite photos are the one of the seed head, the first two with the clouds, and the one farther down with the cumulus in the background. All of them made me smile.

    Like

  2. As you indicate, Wally, not your normal post, but wonderfully uplifting. All that it lacks is a Golden-winger Warbler! I expect you will arrange that for your next post.

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    • There could have been a dozen Golden-winged Warbles among those sunflowers but they would have blended in perfectly!

      Birds are on the future (blogging) menu.

      Like

  3. OK here I am again having changed the password AGAIN!!! WordPress certainly does not make it easy to write comments Wally but at least i did get notification of your post so at least that is progress. Your photographs have just made a good day get even better. Did you hear my singing? I hope so. Have a lovely weekend.

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    • Good Morning, Margaret!

      You successfully negotiated the sign-in gauntlet! Congratulations! Sorry it is such a tiresome process for you.

      What a lovely singing voice you have!
      It was a spectacular place to explore. Wet and muddy – but beautiful.

      Take good care.

      Like

    • Hello, Susan!

      It truly was a joyful experience. Standing among bright flowers so tall I couldn’t see anything but stalks!

      Thank you so much for visiting!

      Like

  4. Beautiful shots! It’s on my list to get over there next year. I usually try and get to Circle B in November for the bur marigolds but these are so much more beautiful.

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    • It is quite a spectacle.

      Take your “Wellies”. It’s wet and muddy out there. Long sleeves will help if you wander around the flats since the plant stems and leaves are very scratchy.

      Good luck with the marigolds!

      Like

  5. Thank you so much for sharing your photos of this year’s sunflowers, Wally. I really enjoyed them, especially since I probably can’t make it out there this time. It’s a special place!

    And thanks too for the shout out – much appreciated!

    Ed

    Like

    • Thank YOU, Ed, for all the great information and motivation!

      It was a great morning. Almost overwhelming in trying to decide what to shoot!

      No cows today, but ran into a curious deer.

      Take care.

      Liked by 1 person

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