Our Natural Places

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Header Image: White-tailed Deer No. The title does not refer to Gini. No matter whether such a description might be true, she may take exception to that “short” thing. And you wouldn’t want me to end up bruised (again), would you? Our days have been interrupted lately with catch-up visits to assorted physicians and lab specialists which were postponed due to the interplanetary plague of recent years. It was becoming serious as… Read More

(Header Image: Pecan Tree) Great segments of the land were decorated in pink. Just for us. Narrow dirt roads had been given the color of the interior of a perfectly baked sweet potato. Just for us. Bright blue skies were punctuated with fluffy formations that were enlarged versions of the cotton which will bloom later this summer. Just for us. The pink in the landscape was due to thousands of peach trees… Read More

 “Come to the woods, for here is rest.” – John Muir Upstate New York is unbelievably beautiful. In autumn, that beauty is enhanced by trees adorned with leaves of hues we never even knew existed. Walking along a path in November, crisp cold air turning your nose red, dry leaves crunching under foot, a Ring-necked Pheasant in a field springing up suddenly and snow beginning to fall gently to create a soft blanket… Read More

(Header Image: Swamp Sparrow) Is our “patch” TOO convenient? I mean, within ten minutes we can be in the middle of some pretty decent birding territory. So it is no wonder we tend to visit it more often than other, more distant locations. As Gini said on this morning, we always see SOMETHING special out here! Today was no different. Central Florida has only four species of sparrow which breed within the… Read More

Eight minutes. “Would it be okay if I go to the park in the morning?” “You know you don’t have to ask. Of course it would be okay.” “It’s just that I have this headache.” “You? Have a headache? That’s unusual!” “I think it’s a migration headache.” “Oh. C’mon, let’s go to bed.” She loves my witty repartee. Birders know the symptoms of the seasons, though. Each spring and autumn scores of… Read More